Call for papers

  

CALL FOR PAPERS

JGPCD – No 6, Issue 1 – 2018 

Entrepreneurial Ecosystems in Transitions: From the Lenses of Local and Global Politics

The Center for European Dialogue and Cultural Diplomacy announces the call for the Summer Issue 2018 of the Journal of Global Politics and Current Diplomacy.

Editors:

  • Fiona SUSSAN, Senior Research Chair, Center for Global Business and Information Technology Research, School of Advanced Studies, University of Phoenix (fiona.sussan@phoenix.edu)
  • Cristina MARINE, Center for Global Business and Information Technology Research, School of Advanced Studies, University of Phoenix, (ilcrbo@email.phoenix.edu).

 

This issue addresses the role of local and global politics in the formation of place-based entrepreneurial ecosystems.  Since political happenings at both the local and global levels are not static, the articles in this issue investigate the dynamic changes occurring in local or global politics that shape the development (progress, stagnant, or regress) of entrepreneurial ecosystems in any place, be it a city, a region, or a country.  Major political happenings include regime change (e.g., Iran), sovereignty change (e.g., Hong Kong), war (e.g., Lebanon), social movement (e.g., Arab Spring), new nation formation (e.g., Serbia), and many others.  While happening locally, these political changes are directly or indirectly impacted by external forces beyond a nation’s political decisions and control.  Research on entrepreneurial ecosystems focuses mainly on the internal workings of a place within the boundaries of its institutions and its agents.  As we know, institutions, both formal and informal, are not static.  In fact, the primary antecedent relative to the dynamics of institutions and their changes are political happenings.  An example that supports our positioning is the recent re-birth of entrepreneurial activities in many Eastern European countries following the collapse of the Soviet Union where communism had politicized economic life. There is a need for researchers to expand their investigation beyond static institutions to find new concepts for explaining and understanding the influence of macro and dynamic political happenings at home and abroad in the formation of any entrepreneurial ecosystem.  The articles in this issue will deliver new insight into how politics enable/hinder the workings of an entrepreneurial ecosystem to include its agents, innovations, social networks, institutions, and the interactions among them.

 

We are seeking papers that:

  • Identify and examine the elements of local and global politics that directly and indirectly impacts an entrepreneurial ecosystem. For example, how does sovereign change impact public resource allocation that in turn affects entrepreneurs’ access to both tangible and intangible capital.
  • Explain longitudinally how these elements and the interactions of these elements make specific contributions or become obstacles to an entrepreneurial ecosystem. For example, how does regime change impact the rule of law that directly or indirectly impacts agents’ capability to start, grow, or maintain a business?
  • Address the tensions between local and global politics and explain how such tensions enable/hinder entrepreneurial ecosystem development at both the institution and agent levels.
  • Compare and contrast place-based entrepreneurial ecosystems that are subject to similar political happenings. For example, how does the sovereignty ‘changing hands’ impact agents’ entrepreneurial spirits?
  • Chronicle the historical impact of political happenings on the workings of institutions within an entrepreneurial ecosystem. Specifically examine the resilience of institutions and their impact on entrepreneurial agents. For example, what are some of the lasting impacts of colonialism on entrepreneurial ecosystems?
  • Explain longitudinally how these elements and the interactions of these elements make specific contributions or become obstacles to an entrepreneurial ecosystem. For example, how does regime change impact the rule of law that directly or indirectly impacts agents’ capability to start, grow, or maintain a business?
  • Address the tensions between local and global politics and explain how such tensions enable/hinder entrepreneurial ecosystem development at both the institution and agent levels.
  • Compare and contrast place-based entrepreneurial ecosystems that are subject to similar political happenings. For example, how does the sovereignty ‘changing hands’ impact agents’ entrepreneurial spirits?
  • Chronicle the historical impact of political happenings on the workings of institutions within an entrepreneurial ecosystem. Specifically examine the resilience of institutions and their impact of entrepreneurial agents. For example, what are some of the lasting impacts of colonialism on entrepreneurial ecosystems?

 

For this issue of Entrepreneurial Ecosystems in Transitions: From the Lenses of Local and Global Politics, we seek to receive new article submissions to complement and extend the extant literature in global policies and current diplomacy.

Submissions to this issue should be sent electronically to Fiona Sussan (fiona.sussan@phoenix.edu) by April 1, 2018.

All submissions will be subject to a peer review process.  Manuscripts must be original, unpublished works that are not concurrently under review for publication elsewhere.

 

Key dates and submission requirements

  • Deadline for submission: April 1, 2018.
  • Notification of review outcome expected early May, 2018.
  • Revisions, proofing, permissions and finalising the paper late June 2018.
  • Publication is expected in July 2018.

 

References

  • Hwang H., Powell W.W. (2005) Institutions and Entrepreneurship. In: Alvarez S.A., Agarwal R., Sorenson O. (eds) Handbook of Entrepreneurship Research. International Handbook Series on Entrepreneurship, vol 2. Springer, Boston, MA
  • Mack, E., Mayer, H. (2016). The evolutionary dynamics of entrepreneurial ecosystems. Urban Studies, 53 (10). 2118-2133.
  • O’Connor A., Stam E., Sussan F., Audretsch D.B. (2018) Entrepreneurial Ecosystems: The Foundations of Place-based Renewal. In: O’Connor A., Stam E., Sussan F., Audretsch D. (eds) Entrepreneurial Ecosystems. International Studies in Entrepreneurship, vol 38. Springer

 

Open Access

JGPCD is published on an open-access, public-good basis—available freely and immediately to the world.

 

Peer Review Policy

  • All research articles proposed for publishing in JGPCD have undergone rigorous peer review, based on initial editors screening and reviewing by at least two anonymous reviewers.
  • Consequently, the peer review process respects the originality and personal opinions of the authors, but Editorial Board reserves the right to demand changes of the form or content of the papers if these are necessary in order to preserve the high quality and competitiveness of the journal.
  • The main selection criteria are:
    • the topical interest of the subject,
    • its relevance to the target groups of the journal,
    • its contribution to the promotion of excellence in education and research in the field of International Relations, European Studies, Political Sciences, and Cultural Diplomacy.

Readership

The JGPCD’s readership primarily consists of universities and think tanks, in particular researchers, teachers and graduate students of International Relations, together with educators and trainers on programmes in Diplomatic Studies, Cultural Diplomacy, International Relations, European Studies, and Economic Sciences.

Secondly, the  JGPCD  is a journal for everyone with an interest or stake in first-rate and accessible articles on all aspects of diplomacy, not least the world’s foreign ministries and diplomatic academies.

DEDIC POSITION

  • The ideas in the papers represent the views of the authors only, not the views of the Centre for European Dialogue and Cultural Diplomacy or of the Editorial Board.

 

COPYRIGHT RULES

  • JGPCD will give priority to the publication of original papers which were not previously published or submitted for reviewing to other journals. Still, a new version of the original work already published, updated and improved, may be accepted if this does not raise exclusive license matters. This issue should nevertheless be mentioned in a footnote.
  • The JGPCD’s Editorial Board shall not be held legally responsible and shall not pay royalties in case of demands for financial compensations from third parties.
  • In case of acceptance for publishing, JGPCD does not impose the exclusive right to publish and disseminate the paper. The article may be re-published, provided the author makes reference to the first publication by JGPCD.